Bathroom Tricks to Help Sell Your Home

Advertisements

Tips for Building a New Home

 

Construction of my home

Construction of my home

If you are in the market for a vacant lot to build your dream home or cottage, or even if you are planning renovations on your existing home, you will find building to be both exhilarating and frustrating.  Having built a new home myself, I thought I would share some of my tips:

1.  Hire professionals
2.  Participate in the design
3.  Think everything through, including the little details (as much as possible) before you begin.
4.  Be prepared to spend a lot more money than you budget for…little things add up quickly.
 5.  Think about RESALE–you may think this will be your last home “ever”, but chances are, it won’t be.  Lifestyles change in moments.
6.  Check all of the possible locations on your property to find the best building site–keep in mind sun position, wind direction, exposure, view, etc.
7.  Work with your contractor through every step–there are always some changes that need to be made
8.  Listen to your contractor
9.  Don’t let anyone talk you out of something that you really want in your home.
10.  Make sure you know where you want ALL of your electrical switches and plug outlets to go.
11.  Make sure your electrician centers your lights or puts them exactly where you want them.
12.  Make sure lines line up.  Make sure things, such as shower drains, are centered.  Once something is done it’s hard, or very expensive to undo.
13.  Test your paint colours.
14.  Enjoy the experience!

Here are some tips from the people at Houzz:

Kathy Dimaline is a Real Estate Broker for RE/MAX Grey Bruce Realty Inc.  The comments on this Blog are the opinions, only, of Kathy Dimaline and do not constitute any legal advice or legal opinion and does not represent the interests or opinions of RE/MAX Grey Bruce Realty Inc., brokerage.

The Outdoor Shower

OutdoorShowerOne of my favourite things at the cottage, now my home, is the “Outdoor” Shower.  I use my outdoor shower all summer long rather than showering indoors.  There’s the feeling of being one with nature.  While showering, I can watch the birds in the trees, see and listen to the lake and just feel good about the day ahead.  I find it invigorating, even on colder days.

The secret to the “Outdoor” shower is to position it right.  You want to make sure you have privacy yet enjoy the scenery around you…so do some scoping out before beginning to build it.  The other very important thing is making sure you have both cold and hot water in your shower.  I’ve seen ones with just cold water but, even on those really hot days it can be a shock to the system.  So, make sure you know what you are doing when you plumb the shower, or better still, hire a plumber.

It’s great in the spring, summer and fall, but you should be sure to winterize it prior to cold weather.  All pipes need to be drained, inside taps to the outside facets should be turned off and leave the outside faucets “open”.  Here’s a great link for winterizing:  http://www.homeenergyresourcemn.org/basic_care/section_detail.aspx?itemID=2956&catID=759&SelectCatID=759&cat_1=751&cat_2=759

Like any other addition to your home an outdoor shower should be approved by the building inspector and may require special drainage.  Be sure to do it right!

Here’s a link to some great “Outdoor” shower designs: 

Kathy Dimaline is a Real Estate Broker for RE/MAX Grey Bruce Realty Inc.  The comments on this Blog are the opinions, only, of Kathy Dimaline and do not constitute any legal advice or legal opinion and does not represent the interests or opinions of RE/MAX Grey Bruce Realty Inc., brokerage.

Trim Your Home or Cottage

Trim can bring out the features of your home, make a room look larger (or smaller), add character, and give an architectural feel. Choose the right trim, the right colour and you can enhance any room. Here’s an interesting article on “How to Bring Out Your Home’s Character with Trim”.

Kathy Dimaline is a Real Estate Broker for RE/MAX Grey Bruce Realty Inc.  The comments on this Blog are the opinions, only, of Kathy Dimaline and do not constitute any legal advice or legal opinion and does not represent the interests or opinions of RE/MAX Grey Bruce Realty Inc., brokerage.

How to Downsize/Declutter

I pulled this up from the Houzz site.  Great suggestions on how to Downsize and Declutter your home.  Great ideas weather you are buying or selling.

A Word about Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

Here’s an interesting article from Pillar to Post Home Inspections…
Carbon Monoxide Poisoning: Avoidance and Prevention
Carbon monoxide (CO) is an odorless, colorless gas produced by the combustion of fuels such as natural gas, oil, and propane in mechanical unit including furnaces, water heaters, and stoves. These items are normally designed to vent the CO to the outside, but harmful interior levels of CO can result from incomplete combustion of fuel, improper installation, or blockages, leaks or cracks in the venting systems. Very high levels of CO can lead to incapacitation or death, with victims sometimes never having been aware they were being poisoned.
Homeowners can take action against potential carbon monoxide poisoning by taking the following steps:

Have all fuel-burning appliances professionally inspected annually, preferably before the start of the cold-weather season when heaters and furnaces are first used.
These appliances include gas stoves and ovens, furnaces and heaters, water heaters, generators, and clothes dryers.
All such units should be properly installed and safely vented to the outside.
If repairs are necessary, be sure they are performed by a qualified technician.
Always use the proper fuel specified for the unit.
Have flues and chimneys for fuel-burning fireplaces or wood stoves inspected regularly for cracks, leaks, and blockages that may allow a buildup of CO to occur.
Never use gas stoves or ovens as a home heating source, even temporarily.
Do not idle a vehicle in a garage, even with the garage door open. When starting the car, open the garage door, start the engine, and drive out as soon as possible to prevent dangerous CO emissions from accumulating.
For additional protection, purchase a CO detector (either battery operated or plug-in) and follow the manufacturer’s instructions for proper location and installation. Installation of working CO detectors in residential properties is now required by law in many areas.
Learn what to do if the CO alarm activates: if anyone in the home experiences symptoms such as fatigue, dizziness, blurred vision, nausea, or confusion, everyone should leave immediately and seek medical attention. If the alarm sounds but no symptoms are felt, open doors and windows immediately and shut off all fuel-burning devices that may be potential sources of CO.

Your local Pillar To Post office looks forward to serving real estate professionals and homeowners all year round. Contact us today!

THE PILLAR TO POST ADVANTAGE
  • The Pillar To Post Inspection Report is generated on site at the completion of the inspection, so your client won’t have to wait for the results.
  • All Pillar To Post inspectors carry E&O insurance to protect you, the referring agent.
  • As North America’s leading home inspection company, Pillar To Post is committed to providing the highest quality service to real estate professionals and their clients.
For more information about home inspection or to schedule a home inspection, click here to find your local Pillar To Post office.

Cal Westholm

Certified Home Inspector

Proudly Serving the Owen Sound area

We know our stuff!

Cal.Westholm@pillartopost.com

www.pillartopost-owensound.com

Phone: 519-376-0414

Cell: 519-374-3771   Fax: 519-376-5313

Let’s talk about “Poop”

Click on photo to Link to Further Information

Click on photo to Link to Further Information

If you are buying a cottage, a rural home or lot, for the first time, chances are you are going to want to know about septic systems.  Simply put, a septic is a management system to treat your wastewater—anything that is put down a toilet and anything that goes down your drain.  Waste flows down from the house to the tank, and down from the tank to a “title bed”.  A traditional septic system is a completely passive system (there are other systems, but that’s a topic for another blog).

Basically, you have a tank that is buried in your yard.  As per the diagram below, wastewater flows into the tank from your house at one end (A) and leaves the tank at the other (E).

SepticTank

As new water enters the tank, it displaces the water that’s already there. This water (C) flows out of the septic tank and into a “tile bed”.  A tile bed is made of perforated pipes buried in trenches in your yard.  This water is then naturally filtered through the earth.

Anything heavier than water, sinks to the bottom of the tank, this is called sludge (D). Soap suds and fats form a floating layer at the top known as “scum” (B).

The organic material in your wastewater is broken down by bacteria, which is a by-product of human waste.  This is a natural process which helps to reduce any scum and sludge from leaving with the water that flows into the tile bed.  Scum and sludge are what must be pumped out so that they do not begin to leave the tank with the water and plug up the tile bed.  You should pump out every 3 to 5 years depending on use.

Here’s an overhead view of the system of your house (A), tank (B), distribution box (C) and tile bed (D), in a traditional septic there are usually 5 runs in the tile bed.

SepticDistribution

It is important to limit the use of soaps and bleaches that may make their way into your septic tank as these can kill off the bacteria needed to reduce scum and sludge.  Avoid chemicals and reduce the amount of toilet paper used.

To keep your system healthy you need to understand it and be able to educate your family and guests.  A good slogan for everyone using your system is:  “If you didn’t eat it, don’t flush it”.

Here are some links for further information on septic systems:

Septic system brochure:  http://www.ene.gov.on.ca/stdprodconsume/groups/lr/@ene/@resources/documents/resource/std01_079839.pdf

Septic system guide:

http://www.mah.gov.on.ca/Asset8306.aspx?method=1

Northern Bruce Peninsula Septic Guide:

http://www.northbrucepeninsula.ca/sites/nbp.civicwebcms.com/files/media/articles/general%20building/Guidelines%20for%20Sewage%20System%20-%20February%202013.pdf

.

Kathy Dimaline is a Real Estate Broker for RE/MAX Grey Bruce Realty Inc.  The comments on this Blog are the opinions, only, of Kathy Dimaline and do not constitute any legal advice or legal opinion and does not represent the interests or opinions of RE/MAX Grey Bruce Realty Inc., brokerage.